Gratitude: 3 Tips for Successful Musical Relationships

Special thanks to Tim and Renee Gerlach, I got to play with them at Vet's Jam in St. Louis at Jefferson Barracks. I think (?) this is 2000-2001ish? As a side, note I was fortunate enough years later to play this stage with the Air Force Band alongside Jennifer Batten (Michael Jackson).

Special thanks to Tim and Renee Gerlach, I got to play in their band called White Elephant at Vet’s Jam in St. Louis at Jefferson Barracks. I think (?) this is 2001-2002ish? As a side, note I was fortunate enough years later to play this stage with the Air Force Band alongside Jennifer Batten (ex-Michael Jackson guitarist).

I’m going to start this post off by saying a big thank you to all of you for your support of this blog (and on a personal note, the support for me as a musician!). It is appreciated more than all of you know. I enjoy making a difference and helping people and hopefully, this blog has and will continue to do that very thing.

Probably more often than not, we tend to reserve displaying our thankfulness to that one day during the year where we graze on turkey all day and spend time with our loved ones. While this celebration of thankfulness is great, it is very important to make it a regular practice. We are all guilty of forgetting to say thank you at some point or another. However, when we remember and say thank you, we are not only enriching other’s lives by displaying gratitude, but we are inadvertently enriching our own. How does this apply to music business? As many of you already know, succeeding in this business (and most business) rests on the relationships that we have with other individuals and organizations. It is a huge team effort! From the people who play on your records, to the crew, to your parents that allowed you to crank it up when you were a kid in the garage for band practice, it is one giant team. Remembering to show gratitude to your team, no matter how small or how big they are, is extremely important. So, here are 3 tips to assist you in saying thanks and maintaining successful musical relationships:

  1. Remember where you came from

We all start somewhere, and I mean everyone. Remember and say thanks to the people who gave you a chance when no one else would. Never forget the folks that let you borrow gear when you couldn’t afford it. Or the folks that helped you record your first song for free. The list could go on and on. Whenever possible, make a concerted effort to stay in touch with these people and say thank you.

  1. Remember who introduced you to that contact

We all know that introductions can sometimes be the spark that ignites a huge bonfire. Sometimes things pan out, sometimes they don’t. In either case, when someone goes out on a limb and introduces you to someone who may be able to help you/work with you, always return to that individual and say thank you for that introduction. That gratitude can go a long way. It will show that not only do you value them as a friend, but you value their effort to help you. This is extremely important to recognize. Remember that they didn’t have to help you, they chose to.

  1. Pay it forward

Tips 1 and 2 lead up to this one quite nicely. In remembering where we came from and who helped us, we can continue to show our gratitude to those individuals by helping others. We carry on the memories of their actions and kindness in our actions. When we choose to not remember, we dishonor them and ultimately disrespect the kindness that was shown us. So, pay it forward!

 

As I close out this week’s post, I think of all the people who have helped me and supported me over the years. The list is staggering. I would not be where I am today without those people. If you are reading this and you have helped me/been there for me/guided me/supported (I could keep going!) . . . please know that I am forever grateful and in your debt for all that you’ve done for me and will absolutely do my best to carry on your kindness. Thank you so very much! I love you guys!!!

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